Energy for All

What is "Sustainable Energy for All"

The United Nations Secretary-General recently launched a pioneering new initiative, "Sustainable Energy for All," to mobilize urgent global action. The Initiative brings all sectors of society to the table: business, governments, investors, community groups and academia. The United Nations is the ideal institution to convene this broad swathe of actors and forge common cause in support of three inter-linked objectives:

  • Ensure universal access to modern energy services.
  • Double the rate of improvement in energy efficiency.
  • Double the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix.

These objectives are complementary. Progress in achieving one can help with progress toward the others. All are to be achieved by 2030, and all are necessary to achieve sustainable energy for all. The Secretary-General's Initiative contributes to the International Year of Sustainable Energy for All in 2012, as declared by all UN Member States, by mobilizing action from all key stakeholders.

Energy is the golden thread that connects economic growth, increased social equity and an environment that allows the world to thrive. Energy enables and empowers.

Touching on so many aspects of life, from job creation to economic development, from security concerns to the empowerment of women, energy lies at the heart of all countries' core interests.

The world faces two urgent and interconnected challenges related to energy, as follows:

One concerns energy access. 1.2 billion people, nearly one person in six on the planet, lack access to electricity. More than twice as many, 2.8 billion people, rely on wood, coal, charcoal or animal waste for cooking and heating. This creates major barriers to eradicating poverty and building shared prosperity.

Where modern energy services are plentiful, the problem is different: waste and pollution. Emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases from fossil fuels are contributing to changes in the Earths' climate that are causing widespread harm to lives, communities, infrastructure, institutions and budgets. Climate change threatens food and water security for hundreds of millions of people around the world, undermining the most essential foundations of local, national and global stability.

Competition for scarce resources is increasing, exacerbating old conflicts and creating new ones. As lands degrade, forests fall and sea levels rise, the movement of people driven from their homes by environmental change may reshape the human geography of the planet.

The key to unlocking both challenges and opportunities at the same time is to provide sustainable energy for all – energy that is accessible, clean, more efficient and affordable, especially for the poor.

Sustainable energy is about new opportunities. It enables businesses – including energy businesses- to grow, generates jobs and creates new markets, thereby empowering women and men. Children can study after dark. Health clinics can sterilize equipment, store life-saving vaccines and undertake emergency procedures after dark. Countries can grow more resilient, building competitive economies. With sustainable energy, countries can leapfrog over the limits of the energy systems of the past and build the clean energy economies of the future, thereby improving the overall quality of life for their citizens.

Energy for All

As per the adoption of the General Assembly Resolution A/RES/70/1 entitled "Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development", last September 25, 2015 the Member States of the United Nations recognized that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extrem`       e poverty, its the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development. The 17 Sustainable Development Goals and its 169 targets demonstrate the scale and ambition of this new universal agenda. They are integrated and indivisible and balance the three dimensions of sustainable development: the economic, social and environment.

The World Organization of Governance and Competitiveness (WOGC) is fully committed to support the efforts made by developing countries in order to achieve the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Likewise, it also recognizes the initiative of the Secretary General, Ban Ki-moon entitled "Sustainable Energy for All", as a key factor that contribute to empower other connected goals by improving the energy matrix of these countries.

As we start implementing some initiatives in the Central American and the Caribbean countries, we are convinced of the need to expand our efforts through the WOGC globally. The SDG's-17 (Partnership for the Goals) is an strategic tool for governments, civil society organizations and the private sector to join efforts everywhere in order to promote the achievement of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Sustainable energy powers opportunity. Yet 1.3 billion people—one in five globally—lack electricity to light their homes or conduct business.

Sustainable development is not possible without sustainable energy

Nearly 40% of the world's population rely on wood, coal, charcoal, or animal waste to cook their food breathing in toxic smoke that causes lung disease and kills nearly two million people a year, most of them women and children.

Electricity enables children to study after dark. It enables water to be pumped for crops, and foods and medicines to be refrigerated. Modern fuels for cooking and heating relieve women from the time-consuming drudgery and danger of traveling long distances to gather wood.

Without access to modern energy, it is not possible to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, the eight-point global agenda adopted by the United Nations in 2000—whether reducing poverty, improving women's and children's health, or broadening the reach of education. Energy facilitates social and economic development, offering opportunity for improved lives and economic progress.

Replacing outdated cookstoves and open fires with modern energy services would save the lives of 800,000 children who die each year as a result of exposure to indoor smoke.

Private-sector investment is key to building and serving those markets

Energy can be used to support businesses and achieve greater prosperity. A farmer who irrigates his fields can double the size of his crop, feed his family, and earn a living. A sewing machine and a light to work from at night can enable a woman to generate extra income for her family.”

Without sustainable energy, we will not meet the Millennium Development Goals.

Greater prosperity means more disposable income and new markets for consumer goods.

Through innovation in energy products and investment in deployment, businesses can create jobs and supply millions of people with the tools they need to make a better life. Policymakers can do their part to remove legal and regulatory barriers that stand in the way of business innovation and investments. Civil society groups can encourage governments to make more sustainable choices and provide community-based models of energy innovation.

Energy is the golden thread that connects economic growth, increased social equity and the environment, which allow the world to thrive. Energy is a core interest for all countries of the world and is inextricably linked to many of the global challenges that they face. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development fully recognizes the critical importance of energy for sustainable development by establishing a goal and targets on energy. 

Sustainable Development Goal 7 represents a watershed in global efforts towards ensuring access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all. It sets out a new global energy agenda accepted by and applicable to all, developed and developing countries alike. The Goal and targets reflect the balance between the three dimensions of sustainable development through the focus on energy access, renewable energy and energy efficiency.

Achieving Sustainable Development Goal 7 and its targets will create significant synergies and simultaneously advance many other Sustainable Development Goals, including the Goals on poverty eradication, food security, clean water and sanitation, health, education, economic growth and the empowerment of youth and women, while combating climate change. Access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all is fundamental to human development and a necessary investment in the collective future.

In this regard, the Word Organization of Governance and Competitiveness (WOGC) has established strategic alliances with several stakeholders, including public and private actors, in order to promote initiatives that can bring practical solutions for vulnerable groups, in particular children and women, in developing countries on issues related to energy. In this context, WOGC together with Nokero Solar and Div-Energy Group are working to bring 20k solar lights bulbs for countries in Central America in 2016.

This initiative is in line with the idea that a shift towards more efficient and renewable energy solutions is essential for addressing climate change and sustainable development challenges. Action to achieve this global energy goal must contribute to limiting the increase in the average global temperature to below 2°C in the long run. Greenhouse gas emissions from the supply and use of energy are changing the Earth’s climate.

Climate change threatens food and water security for hundreds of millions of people around the world. The scale and ambition of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development require a global partnership to ensure its full implementation. Its ambition must be matched by strong political will and scaled-up action on all fronts by all stakeholders.

Montessori Model United Nations

Model United Nations is a simulation of the UN General Assembly and other multilateral bodies. In Model UN, students step into the shoes of ambassadors from UN member states to debate current issues on the organization’s agenda. While playing their roles as ambassadors, student “delegates” make speeches, prepare draft resolutions, negotiate with allies and adversaries, resolve conflicts, and navigate the Model UN conference rules of procedure – all in the interest of mobilizing “international cooperation” to resolve problems that affect countries all over the world.

Before playing out their ambassadorial roles in a Model UN simulation, students research the issue that their committee will address. Model UN participants learn how the international community acts on its concerns about topics including peace and security, human rights, the environment, food and hunger, economic development and globalization. Model UN delegates also look closely at the needs, goals and foreign policies of the countries they will represent at the event. The insights they gain from their exploration of history, geography, culture, economics and science contribute to the authenticity of the simulation when the role playing gets under way. The delegates’ in depth knowledge of their countries guarantees a lively and memorable experience.

What are the topics discussed at the Montessori Model United Nations conferences?

The agenda items discussed in committee vary at each conference. Most conferences tend to focus on current affairs issues that are being discussed in the United Nations. These issues can highlight political, financial and/or social concerns. However, the task of committees might be to address hypothetical concerns or issues from the past or future. For example, many conferences have “crisis” committees, in which delegates must react to a hypothetical or actual crisis situation. Other conferences host historical or future Security Council simulations.

Montessori students learn diplomacy, cooperation and the art of compromise.

Maria Montessori believed in peace education and that philosophy plays itself out at the Montessori Model United Nations. The students learn cooperation and the art of compromise. A prime example came from a parent who I spoke with. Last year, her child was being more of a tough negotiator and didn’t really want to compromise. The child found out that he wasn’t able to work effectively with many delegates that way. This year, that same child learned that cooperation and compromise are much more effective in reaching consensus and his country’s goals. Cooperation was learned through the Montessori Model UN process, and success was tangible as the delegate was able to accomplish a lot more in committee and get much more support on his ideas.

This is in contrast with many other high school and college level conferences where awards are given out. The awards sometimes drive behavior in the sense that compromise is more of a tactic to win rather than for the sake of understanding someone else’s view points. Furthermore, the chairs at these conferences determine who wins awards. They judge how successful delegates were at compromising — success is defined externally rather than internally as illustrated in the Montessori example above.

- See more at: www.montessori-mun.org

As an strategic allied "Montessori Model UN"

Montessori Model UN is an strategic allied of Word Organization of Governance and Competitiveness (WOGC) in promoting the implementation of the SDG-4 (Quality Education). Likewise, WOGC is supporting the 2016 Montessori Model UN with a view to create a link between experiences learned in this conference with specific initiatives in developing countries.

Energy for All

As per the adoption of the General Assembly Resolution A/RES/70/1 entitled "Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development", last September 25, 2015 the Member States of the United Nations recognized that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, its the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development. The 17 Sustainable Development Goals and its 169 targets demonstrate the scale and ambition of this new universal agenda. They are integrated and indivisible and balance the three dimensions of sustainable development: the economic, social and environment.

The World Organization of Governance and Competitiveness (WOGC) is fully committed to support the efforts made by developing countries in order to achieve the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Likewise, it also recognizes the initiative of the Secretary General, Ban Ki-moon entitled "Sustainable Energy for All", as a key factor that contribute to empower other connected goals by improving the energy matrix of these countries.

As we start implementing some initiatives in the Central American and the Caribbean countries, we are convinced of the need to expand our efforts through the WOGC globally. The SDG's-17 (Partnership for the Goals) is an strategic tool for governments, civil society organizations and the private sector to join efforts everywhere in order to promote the achievement of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Sustainable energy powers opportunity. Yet 1.3 billion people—one in five globally—lack electricity to light their homes or conduct business.

Sustainable development is not possible without sustainable energy

Nearly 40% of the world's population rely on wood, coal, charcoal, or animal waste to cook their food breathing in toxic smoke that causes lung disease and kills nearly two million people a year, most of them women and children.

Electricity enables children to study after dark. It enables water to be pumped for crops, and foods and medicines to be refrigerated. Modern fuels for cooking and heating relieve women from the time-consuming drudgery and danger of traveling long distances to gather wood.

Without access to modern energy, it is not possible to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, the eight-point global agenda adopted by the United Nations in 2000—whether reducing poverty, improving women's and children's health, or broadening the reach of education. Energy facilitates social and economic development, offering opportunity for improved lives and economic progress.

Replacing outdated cookstoves and open fires with modern energy services would save the lives of 800,000 children who die each year as a result of exposure to indoor smoke.

Private-sector investment is key to building and serving those markets

Energy can be used to support businesses and achieve greater prosperity. A farmer who irrigates his fields can double the size of his crop, feed his family, and earn a living. A sewing machine and a light to work from at night can enable a woman to generate extra income for her family.”

Without sustainable energy, we will not meet the Millennium Development Goals.

Greater prosperity means more disposable income and new markets for consumer goods.

Through innovation in energy products and investment in deployment, businesses can create jobs and supply millions of people with the tools they need to make a better life. Policymakers can do their part to remove legal and regulatory barriers that stand in the way of business innovation and investments. Civil society groups can encourage governments to make more sustainable choices and provide community-based models of energy innovation.

Energy is the golden thread that connects economic growth, increased social equity and the environment, which allow the world to thrive. Energy is a core interest for all countries of the world and is inextricably linked to many of the global challenges that they face. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development fully recognizes the critical importance of energy for sustainable development by establishing a goal and targets on energy. 

Sustainable Development Goal 7 represents a watershed in global efforts towards ensuring access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all. It sets out a new global energy agenda accepted by and applicable to all, developed and developing countries alike. The Goal and targets reflect the balance between the three dimensions of sustainable development through the focus on energy access, renewable energy and energy efficiency.

Achieving Sustainable Development Goal 7 and its targets will create significant synergies and simultaneously advance many other Sustainable Development Goals, including the Goals on poverty eradication, food security, clean water and sanitation, health, education, economic growth and the empowerment of youth and women, while combating climate change. Access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all is fundamental to human development and a necessary investment in the collective future.

In this regard, the Word Organization of Governance and Competitiveness (WOGC) has established strategic alliances with several stakeholders, including public and private actors, in order to promote initiatives that can bring practical solutions for vulnerable groups, in particular children and women, in developing countries on issues related to energy. In this context, WOGC together with Nokero Solar and Div-Energy Group are working to bring 20k solar lights bulbs for countries in Central America in 2016.

This initiative is in line with the idea that a shift towards more efficient and renewable energy solutions is essential for addressing climate change and sustainable development challenges. Action to achieve this global energy goal must contribute to limiting the increase in the average global temperature to below 2°C in the long run. Greenhouse gas emissions from the supply and use of energy are changing the Earth’s climate.

Climate change threatens food and water security for hundreds of millions of people around the world. The scale and ambition of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development require a global partnership to ensure its full implementation. Its ambition must be matched by strong political will and scaled-up action on all fronts by all stakeholders.

Montessori Model United Nations

Model United Nations is a simulation of the UN General Assembly and other multilateral bodies. In Model UN, students step into the shoes of ambassadors from UN member states to debate current issues on the organization’s agenda. While playing their roles as ambassadors, student “delegates” make speeches, prepare draft resolutions, negotiate with allies and adversaries, resolve conflicts, and navigate the Model UN conference rules of procedure – all in the interest of mobilizing “international cooperation” to resolve problems that affect countries all over the world.

Before playing out their ambassadorial roles in a Model UN simulation, students research the issue that their committee will address. Model UN participants learn how the international community acts on its concerns about topics including peace and security, human rights, the environment, food and hunger, economic development and globalization. Model UN delegates also look closely at the needs, goals and foreign policies of the countries they will represent at the event. The insights they gain from their exploration of history, geography, culture, economics and science contribute to the authenticity of the simulation when the role playing gets under way. The delegates’ in depth knowledge of their countries guarantees a lively and memorable experience.

What are the topics discussed at the Montessori Model United Nations conferences?

The agenda items discussed in committee vary at each conference. Most conferences tend to focus on current affairs issues that are being discussed in the United Nations. These issues can highlight political, financial and/or social concerns. However, the task of committees might be to address hypothetical concerns or issues from the past or future. For example, many conferences have “crisis” committees, in which delegates must react to a hypothetical or actual crisis situation. Other conferences host historical or future Security Council simulations.

Montessori students learn diplomacy, cooperation and the art of compromise.

Maria Montessori believed in peace education and that philosophy plays itself out at the Montessori Model United Nations. The students learn cooperation and the art of compromise. A prime example came from a parent who I spoke with. Last year, her child was being more of a tough negotiator and didn’t really want to compromise. The child found out that he wasn’t able to work effectively with many delegates that way. This year, that same child learned that cooperation and compromise are much more effective in reaching consensus and his country’s goals. Cooperation was learned through the Montessori Model UN process, and success was tangible as the delegate was able to accomplish a lot more in committee and get much more support on his ideas.

This is in contrast with many other high school and college level conferences where awards are given out. The awards sometimes drive behavior in the sense that compromise is more of a tactic to win rather than for the sake of understanding someone else’s view points. Furthermore, the chairs at these conferences determine who wins awards. They judge how successful delegates were at compromising — success is defined externally rather than internally as illustrated in the Montessori example above.

- See more at: www.montessori-mun.org

As an strategic allied "Montessori Model UN"

Montessori Model UN is an strategic allied of Word Organization of Governance and Competitiveness (WOGC) in promoting the implementation of the SDG-4 (Quality Education). Likewise, WOGC is supporting the 2016 Montessori Model UN with a view to create a link between experiences learned in this conference with specific initiatives in developing countries.

Ecuador, Quick Response Initiative

In the context of the implementation of the WOGC Energy Project in Central American countries, on April 16, 2016 Ecuador experienced an earthquake at 18:58:37 ECT with a moment magnitude of 7.8 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of VIII (Severe). The very large thrust earthquake was centered approximately 27 km (17 mi) from the towns of Muisne and Pedernales in a sparsely populated part of the country, and 170 km (110 mi) from the capital Quito, where it was felt strongly. Regions of Manta, Pedernales and Portoviejo accounted for over 75 percent of total casualties. Manta's central commercial shopping district Tarqui was completely destroyed. Widespread damage was caused across Manabi province, with structures hundreds of kilometres from the epicenter collapsing. At least 673 people were killed and 27,732 people injured. President Rafael Correa declared a state of emergency; 13,500 military personnel and police officers were dispatched for recovery operations.

In this regard, the Word Organization of Governance and Competitiveness adopted a quick response initiative by donating 1000 solar lights bulbs to the Consulate of Ecuador in New Jersey with a view to provide immediate assistance to the victims of the earthquake.

ISNA - El Salvador Initiative

In coordination with the National Executive Director of Plan Trifinio El Salvador, Dr. Sergio Bran, the World Organization of Governance and Competitiveness Vice-Presidents, Christian Batres and Monica Westin, visited the Trifinio region - El Salvador, together with  the Executive Director of ISNA, Elda Gladys Tobar Ortiz, in order to distribute among local vulnerable families the Solar lights bulbs donated by WOGC.

Nearly 40% of the world's population rely on wood, coal, charcoal, or animal waste to cook their food breathing in toxic smoke that causes lung disease and kills nearly two million people a year, most of them women and children.

Electricity enables children to study after dark. It enables water to be pumped for crops, and foods and medicines to be refrigerated. Modern fuels for cooking and heating relieve women from the time-consuming drudgery and danger of traveling long distances to gather wood.

Without access to modern energy, it is not possible to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, the eight-point global agenda adopted by the United Nations in 2000—whether reducing poverty, improving women's and children's health, or broadening the reach of education. Energy facilitates social and economic development, offering opportunity for improved lives and economic progress.

Replacing outdated cookstoves and open fires with modern energy services would save the lives of 800,000 children who die each year as a result of exposure to indoor smoke.

For further information about projects promoted by ISNA, please visit:

http://www.isna.gob.sv/ISNANEW/?p=2937

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